The Outlaw Ocean

Dear Subscribers,

This month’s catch (a combination of king salmon and rockfish) comes from one of our most prolific fishermen: Jeff Farvour.

Usually, I like to use this space to highlight facts about our boats, captains, or the fish you're about to enjoy. However, this week, I'd like to draw our attention to a recent series by the NYTimes.

Before working for Alaskans Own, I worked for Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women (GAATW), an anti-trafficking organization based out of Bangkok, Thailand. While there, I focused on the intersection between human trafficking and marine sustainability. At the time, it was a relatively obscure topic. But thanks to organizations like Alaskans Own and support from subscribers like you, seafood traceability is becoming a recognized issue.

I’m proud to be working for an organization that works to improve labor conditions and the marine environment. I’m proud to be serving our members; people who have chosen to support these values. Thank you all for making this possible.

So, this week, I encourage all of you to read the New York Times series: The Outlaw Ocean, to see how much further our work needs to go. I've highlighted three articles below. I hope that by reading it, you can learn more about the types of practices that—by joining Alaskans Own—you are taking a stand against.

(Please be advised that one of the videos in the series is particularly graphic. I have not attached a link, though it can be found through the homepage I’ve linked to above. )

Thank you,

Caroline

Alaskans Own Project Director

 

PART ONE: STOWAWAYS AND CRIMES ABOARD A SCOFFLAW SHIP

Out here, “the ground swallows you whole.”

PART THREE: SEA SLAVES’: THE HUMAN MISERY THAT FEEDS PETS AND LIVESTOCK

“Life at sea is cheap, and conditions out there keep getting worse.

PART FOUR: A RENEGADE TRAWLER, HUNTED FOR 10,000 MILES BY VIGILANTES

“It takes a pirate to catch a pirate.